Monday, 18 February 2019

Outing Report: Sezela Sugar Mill - 10 February 2019



Species Identified: 72                                                                      Text: Hazel van Rooyen

Attendees: Sandy Olver, Alastair Warman, Robin & Devin Mortimer, Robin Eccles & Hanli Kloppers, Graham & Sue Salthouse, Hazel Nevin, Stanley Gengan, Johan & Karin Burger, Stan & Val Culley, Margaret Jones, Doug & Angie Butcher, Clive & Margie Cowan, Bob & Hazel van Rooyen (21)


Giant Kingfisher (photo HvR)


Quite a crowd had gathered just off the highway for our outing to Sezela Sugar Mill grounds.  Alastair had organised all the keys for us as the dams are now fenced off for safety reasons and he led us to the first dam where we parked at the top and clambered down to get closer to the “action”.  First to be spotted was this Giant Kingfisher fishing from an inlet pipe.


Cars lined up on the dam wall  (photo Doug Butcher)

Happy Birders (photo Doug Butcher)



Giant Kingfisher (photo Doug Butcher)
Little Rush Warblers could be heard warbling in the thick reeds and Southern Red Bishops buzzed about building nests.  An African Darter flew in and proceeded to dry off his wings.  In a corner a Black Crake showed itself, then calmly stepped daintily back into the safety of the long grass.  Barn Swallows and Black Saw-wings made circles over the dam, hawking insects in their never-ending search for food.  A Burchell’s Coucal perched on the reed-tops while a Pied Kingfisher thought all the activity might have stirred up some tasty morsels for him too.  A large flock of Blacksmith Lapwings soared above us.  The more we looked, the more we saw, but eventually coffee called and we drove further on to a spot close to the river for breakfast.


 
Blacksmith Lapwings (photo Sue Salthouse)

Most of us then took a long walk next to the river which was, however, very clogged with reeds. A Common Buzzard perched on a dead tree.  Other birds spotted along here were Black-collared Barbet, Tambourine Dove, White-eared Barbet, Little Bee-eater, Purple Heron and a Pygmy Kingfisher. 

A few other birders chose to watch at the low-level bridge for any activity.
 
Purple Heron (photo Doug Butcher
Little Bee-eater (photo HvR)


Moving on to the picnic spot at Mkumbane Dam, tall trees provided some much-appreciated shade.  Scanning the lake, Little Grebe and African Jacana were seen and through his scope Stan spotted  African Black Duck on the opposite side.  Around us Golden-tailed Woodpeckers shrieked and Klaas’s Cuckoo called.  Taking a walk to the end and through some fencing brought us closer to the lily pads where we saw a 3-banded Plover, Wood Sandpiper, and Yellow-billed Duck.  Going even further along Stanley, Alastair, Robin and Bob saw a Lesser Moorhen which are rare on the South Coast but have been turning up more often this year.

 
3-banded Plover (photo HvR)













Brown Snake Eagle and Black-chested Snake Eagles were identified along with a juvenile Crowned Eagle and the day wouldn't have been complete with an African Fish Eagle.
Black-chested Snake Eagle (photo HvR)

African Fish Eagle (photo Doug Butcher)

African Crowned Eagle (photo HvR)

 
Birders looking... looking.. (photo Sue Salthouse)

All photos property of photographer

Species: 72
Barbet, Black-collared
Barbet, White-eared
Bee-eater, Little
Bishop, Southern Red
Boubou, Southern
Bulbul, Black-capped
Cameroptera, Green-backed
Canary, Yellow-fronted
Cormorant, White-breasted
Coucal, Burchell’s
Crake, Black
Cuckoo, Diderik’s
Cuckoo, Klaas’s
Darter, African
Dove, Red-eye
Dove, Tambourine
Drongo, Fork-tailed
Duck, African Black
Duck, White-faced
Duck, Yellow-billed
Eagle, African Fish
Eagle, Black-chested Snake
Eagle, Brown Snake
Eagle, Crowned, Juv
Egret, Cattle
Fiscal, Common
Flycatcher, Southern Black
Goose, Egyptian
Goose, Spurwing
Grebe, Little
Heron, Black-headed
Heron, Goliath (Juv)
Heron, Grey
Heron, Purple
Jacana, African
Kingfisher, Brown-hooded

Kingfisher, Giant
Kingfisher, Malachite
Kingfisher, Pied
Kingfisher, Pygmy
Kite, Yellow-billed
Lapwing, Blacksmith
Longclaw, Yellow-throated
Mannikin, Red-backed
Moorhen, Common
Moorhen, Lesser
Mousebird, Speckled
Myna, Common
Oriole, Black-headed
Plover, 3-banded
Prinia, Tawny-flanked
Sandpiper, Wood
Saw-wing, Black
Spurfowl, Natal
Starling, Black-bellied
Starling, Red-winged
Starling, Violet-backed
Stonechat, African
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, White-throated
Turaco, Knysna
Turaco, Purple-crested
Wagtail, Cape
Wagtail, Pied
Warbler, Little Rush
Weaver, Thick-billed
Weaver, Village
Weaver, Yellow
Whydah, Pin-tailed
Widowbird, Fan-tailed
Wood-hoopoe, Green
Woodpecker, Golden-tailed







Saturday, 16 February 2019

UPCOMING OUTING: Mpenjati NR, 24 February 2019



Dear Members & Friends

White-fronted Plover


Sunday 24 February at 06:30 BirdLife Trogons will visit Mpenjati Nature Reserve.  Bring chairs, breakfast and something to braai for lunch. All welcome.  There is a R20pp charge for non-members of BirdLife Trogons.  Outings may be cancelled due to weather, check www.birdlifetrogons.blogspot.com or phone Hazel before setting off.  For further details telephone Hazel van Rooyen on 072 355 8837 or visit the blog.

Please let Hazel know if you will be attending the outing.

Directions:  From R61 meet at the Mpenjati South entrance gate.  There is a R20 per person entrance fee, negated if you have a Rhino card.  Set GPS to DD MM SS.S = S30 58 18.2 E30 16 39.3

Kind regards
Hazel van Rooyen
Secretary
BirdLife Trogons Bird Club

Friday, 1 February 2019

UPCOMING OUTING: Sezela Sugar Mill, Pennington - 10 February 2019

Collared Sunbird (photo: Stan Culley)


Dear Members and Friends

Sunday 10 February at 06:30 BirdLife Trogons will visit Sezela Sugar Mill, Pennington.  Bring chairs, breakfast and something to braai for lunch.  ALL WELCOME.  There is a R20 charge for non-members of BirdLife Trogons.  Outings may be cancelled due to weather, check www.birdlifetrogons.blogspot.com or phone Hazel on 072 355 8837 before setting off.

PLEASE LET HAZEL KNOW IF YOU WILL BE ATTENDING.

Directions: From the N2 take the R102 off-ramp and turn towards Pennington.  Meet on the left-hand side grass verge just before the right turn to Sezela.  Set GPS to DD MM SS.S = S30 23 25.9 E30 39 16.9

Many thanks
Hazel van Rooyen
Secretary
BirdLife Trogons


Sunday, 27 January 2019

Outing report: River Valley Nature Reserve - 27 January 2019



African Crake (photo Hazel van Rooyen)

Species Identified: 51                                                                     Text: Hazel van Rooyen

Attending: Stan & Val Culley, Danie & Bella du Toit, Doug & Angie Butcher, Margie Cowan, Margaret Jones, Hester & Babs Pieterse, Rooksane Gangat & Rouida Kathrada, Graham & Sue Salthouse, Bob & Hazel van Rooyen

The day started off well for Bob and Hazel with a sighting of the out-of-range African Crake just outside the gates of River Valley.  Unfortunately, everyone arrived all at once and frightened it back into the long reeds.  Andrew Lewis, the owner, had been seeing it with a single chick but we didn’t get a sighting of the chick.
African Crake (photo HvR)

The cavalcade drove down to the Vungu river, en route setting in motion lots of Yellow-fronted Canaries and Fan-tailed Widowbirds in the grassland.  Lesser-striped Swallows and Barn Swallows swooped about, drawing circles in the air.  Down by the river a Pied Wagtail foraged while male and female Thick-billed Weavers chased each other around in the never-ending pursuit of procreation. 
Thick-billed Weaver (photo Sue Salthouse)
A very well camouflaged Jackal Buzzard looked over its domain from a Euphorbia tree high up on the opposite hillside.  Walking through the undergrowth all was still and quiet except for the pop-pop-popping of the Yellow-rumped Tinkerbirds and kwit-kwit-kwit of the Green-backed Cameroptera.  Out in the open a Common Buzzard perched on a tall tree accompanied by African Green Pigeons.  In the grassland a Croaking Cisticola was identified while a Tambourine Dove called softly in the distance.  Re-tracing our steps Olive Sunbirds were spotted in the shrubbery and Sombre Greenbulls called.  Back at the vehicles coffee and breakfast was the order of the day and we all tucked in.
Olive Sunbird (photo HvR)


Having re-fuelled our bodies we set off in the opposite direction through rippling grassland on the right and woods on the left.  A Golden-tailed Woodpecker screeched to the left and a Yellow-throated Longclaw flapped over the grass-tops.  Further along, the pathway led down to a lovely viewpoint overlooking the river.  
Doug, the photographer (photo HvR)



Crowned Hornbill (photo HvR)

Tawny-flanked Prinia (photo: HvR)

Back at the picnic area we sat for a while watching Crowned and Trumpeter Hornbills criss-crossing the valley while Crowned Eagles called from on High whilst a Tawny-flanked Prinia hopped amongst the reeds at the edge of the river. After a relaxing braai we packed up and made our way home, just in time as the promised rain arrived soon after.




Thanks to everyone who came and special thanks to Andrew Lewis for letting us visit his beautiful verdant valley.  We must not forget to mention the many buck on his farm – impala, duiker, nyala amongst others.
Village Weaver nests on fever trees 
but many more on the ground,
 blown off by our recent strong winds.
 (photo HvR)





















Along our walks we noticed several of these frogs which were well camouflaged against the leaf matter on the forest floor, even to the yellow stripe down its back.


Apalis, Bar-throated
Barbet, Black-collared
Boubou, Southern-capped
Bulbul, Dark-capped
Buzzard, Jackal
Buzzard, Steppe (Common)
Cameroptera, Green-backed
Canary, Yellow-fronted
Cisticola, Croaking
Crake, African
Dove, Red-eyed
Dove, Tambourine
Drongo, Fork-tailed
Eagle, African Fish
Eagle, Crowned
Fiscal, Common
Goose, Egyptian
Greenbul, Sombre
Hornbill, Crowned
Hornbill, Trumpeter
Ibis, Hadedah
Kingfisher, Brown-hooded
Kite, Yellow-billed
Longclaw, Yellow-throated
Mousebird, Speckled
Oriole, Black-headed
 Pigeon, African Green
Prinia, Tawny-flanked
Raven, White-necked
Robin, Brown Scrub
Robin-chat, Red-capped
Sawwing, Black
Spurfowl, Natal
Starling, Black-bellied
Sunbird, Olive
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, Lesser-striped
Swift, African Palm
Swift, White-rumped
Tinkerbird, Yellow-rumped
Turaco, Knysna
Turaco, Purple-crested
Wagtail, Mountain
Wagtail, Pied
Weaver, Dark-backed
Weaver, Spectacled
Weaver, Thick-billed
Weaver, Village
Weaver, Yellow
Widowbird, Fantailed
Woodpecker, Golden-tailed





Thursday, 24 January 2019

Outing report: Oribi Gorge Nature Reserve and Vulture Viewing Hide - 13 January 2019

Cape Vulture (photo Doug Butcher)


Attending: Barrie Willis & Sue Hansbury, Stan & Val Culley, Stanley & Asothie Gengan, Doug & Angie Butcher, Margaret Jones, Lia Steen, Clive & Margie Cowan, Robin Eccles, Alastair Warman, Leon & Annette Du Toit, Danie Du Toit, Tim & Helen McClurg, Andy Ruffle (20)

A hot and windy day did not deter a good turn-out for the popular Oribi Gorge and of course the ever-entertaining Cape Vultures.

Cape Vulture (photo: Doug Butcher)

View of Oribi Gorge (photo: Doug Butcher)


European Honey Buzzard (photo: Doug Butcher)


Species identified: 52


Barbet, Black-collared
Batis, Cape
Boubou, Southern
Brownbul, Terrestrial
Bulbul, Dark-capped
Buzzard, European Honey
Buzzard, Jackal
Cameroptera, Green-backed
Canary, Yellow-fronted
Chat, Familiar
Crow, Pied
Cuckoo, Black
Cuckoo, Diederick
Cuckoo, Red-chested
Dove, Cape Turtle
Dove, Red-eyed
Duck, White-faced
Falcon, Lanner
Fiscal, Common
Flycatcher, Paradise
Greenbul, Sombre
Honeyguide, Lesser
Hornbill, Trumpeter
Kite, Yellow-billed
Longclaw, Yellow-throated
Mannikin, Bronze

Moorhen, Common
Neddicky
Oriole, Black-headed
Prinia, Tawny-flanked
Raven, White-necked
Robin-Chat, Red-capped
Saw-wing, Black
Starling, Black-bellied
Starling, Red-winged
Starling, Violet-backed
Stonechat, African
Sunbird, Amethyst
Sunbird, Olive
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, Lesser-striped
Swift, Palm
Thrush, Cape Rock
Tinkerbird, Red-fronted
Tinkerbird, Yellow-rumped
Turaco, Knysna
Turaco, Purple-crested
Vulture, Cape
Waxbill, Common
Weaver, Thick-billed
Weaver, Village
Widowbird, Red-collared




Saturday, 19 January 2019

UPCOMING OUTING: River Valley Nature Reserve, Uvongo - 27 January 2019

Pied Kingfisher (photo Stan Culley)



Dear Members and Friends

Sunday, 27 January 06:30 BirdLife Trogons will visit River Valley Nature Reserve in Uvongo.  There is an entrance charge of R20 per person.  Bring chairs, breakfast and something to braai for lunch.  All welcome.  There is a R20 charge for non-members of BirdLife Trogons.  Outings may be cancelled due to the weather, check www.birdlifetrogons.blogspot.com or phone Hazel before setting off.  For further details phone Hazel van Rooyen on 072 355 8837.

Please let Hazel know if you will be attending the outing.

Directions:  Travel south from Durban on the N2 toll road. At the Port Shepstone toll head straight on the R61 towards Port Edward. Take the second off ramp, (Margate/Uvongo) and turn right into Wingate Ave and go back across the highway. You will pass the Margate Country Club on your right hand side. Continue along Wingate for another 500m past Country Club and you will see the sign pointing right into Portal Ave. Drive down Portal Ave and follow signs to the gate.  GPS Co Ordinates S 30.83’436” E 30.35’880”  Meet here.

Many thanks
Kind regards
Hazel van Rooyen
Secretary
BirdLife Trogons Bird Club

Friday, 4 January 2019

UPCOMING OUTING: Oribi Gorge Nature Reserve - 13 January 2019



Bar-throated Apalis
Dear Members

Sunday 13 January 6.30am BirdLife Trogons will visit Oribi Gorge Nature Reserve.  An entrance fee of R30 per person is payable but negated if you have either a Rhino card or Wildcard.  There is a R20pp charge for non-members of BirdLife Trogons.  Bring chairs, packed breakfast and meat to braai for lunch.  Outings may be cancelled due to weather, check www.birdlifetrogons.blogspot.com or phone Hazel van Rooyen on 072 355 8837 before setting off.  All Welcome.

Please let Hazel know if you will be attending the outing.

Directions: Take N2 towards Harding, the Oribi Gorge NR turnoff is on the right just before Paddock.  Turn first left and meet at the KZN office at the hutted camp.  Set GPS to DD MM SS.S = S30 43 55.5  E30 16 24.0

Many thanks
Hazel van Rooyen
Secretary
BirdLife Trogons Bird Club

Monday, 31 December 2018

Bulwer away-trip, 26-30 November 2018 including Ashtonvale, Hela Hela, Highover, Sani Pass


Total Species identified: 102
Script: Hazel van Rooyen
Jackal Buzzard (photo Stan Culley)

Participants: Barrie Willis & Sue Hansbury, Stan & Val Culley, Graham & Sue Salthouse, Stanley & Asothie Gengan, Vic & Kay Neilson, and Bob & Hazel van Rooyen


View from Ashtonvale (photo: HvR)

A motley crew! (photo Sue Salthouse)


Red-chested Cuckoo (photo Stan Culley)


At the end of November 2018, 12 club members visited Ashtonvale Guest Farm for our Spring trip away.  On arrival, a pair of friendly Familiar Chats flitted in the garden of our house and became a “familiar” sight during our stay.  A small herd of cows and some donkeys grazed in the field next to us adding to the sense of peace of the rural scene of rolling hills and forestry.  The weather was threatening rain and so we contented ourselves with settling in and exploring the property and found a lovely place to braai on the garden patio which was next to an enclosed patio where we made ourselves comfortable each evening around a table tennis table to eat our supper.  Later we discovered a dining room but nobody seemed to mind our choice of eating-place!  Other birds seen on our way in and round about the farm were a Long-crested Eagle, Jackal Buzzard and Barn Swallows, amongst others (see list at end).

On Tuesday we added Speckled Mousebird, White-rumped Swift and a Red-chested Cuckoo which called incessantly from a forest across the field.  A 6am start found us en route to Hela Hela. 
View from Hela Hela
African Stonechat abounded on the telephone wires, while a Yellow-billed Kite and Jackal Buzzard graced the skies. 
Jackal Buzzard (photo: Stan Culley)


Cape Vulture (photo HvR)
Arriving at the farm gate a couple of Cape Vultures sailed curiously overhead.  We had called ahead to arrange a key from the Highover manager but a team of labourers were already busy moving recently logged trees.  Our target was the Black-rumped Buttonquail so we spread out to cover the grassland in the hope of flushing this special bird. 
Spread out to look for the Black-rumped Buttonquail
A slow walk of about 2 hours in 44 deg heat ensued, the only quails found being Common Quails.  We did disturb a Denham’s Bustard which was a nice sighting.  On returning to the vehicles, those who hadn’t managed more than 100 metres gleefully reported that the Black-rumped Buttonquail had flushed at their feet.  Some other species identified were African Black Swift, African Pipit, Rufous-naped Lark, Fan-tailed Widowbird, and Emerald Cuckoo.

Cape Batis (photo) HvR)

This was followed by a visit to Highover where we found a shady place to breakfast.  Green Wood-Hoopoe. Yellow-throated Woodland Warbler, Cape Batis, Bar-throated Apalis were noted, even though the bush was very very dry.  The accommodation looked quite run down which was a pity as we had enjoyed our previous stay so much.

On rising the next day our hopes for another early start dwindled as the heavy mist turned into rain.  We moved into the huge hotel lounge where the staff made us cosy with a roaring log fire as temperatures had dropped to 18 deg.  Barrie came to our rescue with a fun quiz – boys vs girls – which was won by the boys by half a point!  Around the hotel grounds we added Drakensburg Prinia, Hamerkop and Greater-striped Swallow and Ant-eating Chat to our Ashtonvale list
.
Ant-eating Chat (photo Stan Culley)

By this time it looked as if the weather was clearing so we took to our vehicles (doubling up as usual) and followed directions from Roberts to Comrie Dam.  We found an indentation that looked as if  it could have been a shallow dam sometime in the distant past but after travelling 15km over and above the 4km required, with no sign of water, we decided to turn around.  However, later on we thought we may have been hasty and should have continued along the dirt road.

African Olive Pigeons (photo Stan Culley)


So we moved on to the Marutswa Forest & Boardwalk, searching for the Orange Ground Thrush and Cape Parrot.  Close to the entrance a flock of African Olive Pigeons perched on a tall dead tree. The forest was lovely, wild gloxinias flowered at the foot of massive trees.  The boardwalks had sadly been trashed and some attractive, fairly new reception rooms at the entrance had been vandalised.  Very sad, what a waste.  Birdlife was scarce but we did at least hear the Orange Ground Thrush calling several times quite close by.  No sign of the Cape Parrot but Russell Hills, our host at Ashtonvale brought some of us up the next afternoon just before sunset to see them as they usually roost there.  He had recently taken an overseas film crew there with success. However, still no sign, maybe we left a little early – later I read the roosting times can be extended during misty weather.  Other birds heard in the forest were Sombre Greenbul, Knysna Turaco and Green-backed Cameroptera.  Stan also saw an African Harrier Hawk.

Brown-throated Martin (photo Hazel van Rooyen)
Streaky-headed Seedeater (photo Hazel van Rooyen)








On Thursday we took a drive around the area and part-way up the Sani Pass.  We crossed a pretty river called the Polelwa, over which Brown-throated Martin and White-throated Swallows swooped.  Further on we spotted a Streaky-headed Seedeater, Levaillant’s Cisticola and a Red-necked Spurfowl, a Lifer for some.  
Red-necked Spurfowl (photo Stan Culley)
Giant Kingfisher (photo Hazel van Rooyen)

Lake near Himeville (photo Hazel van Rooyen)

It was lovely to see Vic & Kay Neilson who are well and enjoying their retirement in Himeville, they joined in all the activities and send their kind regards to all the members they used to know.   Close to Himeville Vic & Kay took us to a pretty lake surrounded by exotic parkland, which was privately owned and maintained but open to the public.  Here we saw Little Grebe, Reed Cormorant, Common Moorhen, Giant Kingfisher, Red-knobbed Coot, and Brown-hooded Kingfisher.

When we reached the base of the Sani Pass we stopped off at the Giant Teacup where Vic arranged for us to trek up one of their trails.  Here we saw the Ground Woodpecker and Long-crested Eagle and around the tearoom were Olive Thrush, Drakensburg Prinia and Greater Double-collared Sunbird.

At Sani Pass major road works are happening and the going is very very slow.  Halfway up we pulled off for some lunch.  The scenery was amazing and the birdlife was good, especially considering the upheaval going on around. 
View of Sani Pass
Yellow Bishop (photo Hazel van Rooyen)



Gurney's Sugarbird (photo Stan Culley)
Cape Canary (photo Hazel van Rooyen)

Yellow Bishop, Gurney’s Sugarbird, Cape Canary, Red-collared Widowbird and Buff-streaked Chat kept us entertained.  On the drive back we passed a dam, close to Okhalweni Railway Station where we added Cape Shoveller, Black-winged Stilt, Whiskered Tern, Ruff, African Spoonbill, Shelduck, amongst others.

The owners of Ashtonvale Guest Farm, Russell and Carol Hills made us very welcome and if the accommodation stretched our imagination, the great company made up for it.  Thanks go to Russell and Carol for accommodating us and making us feel at home.  They have a great family holiday establishment with lots of animals including a friendly pot-bellied pig, milking cows, croquet, bowls, tennis and table tennis, a tiny chapel for weddings, plus a lovely swimming pool which cooled the writer down on the hottest of days.

Thanks again to one and all for another great trip.
Common (Steppe) Buzzard (photo Stan Culley)

 All photos copyright of photographer

Species identified: Apalis, Bar-throated; Barbet, Black-collared; Batis, Cape; Bishop, Southern Red; Bishop, Yellow; Bokmakierie; Boubou, Southern; Bulbul, Black-capped; Bustard, Denham’s; Buttonquail, Black-rumped; Buzzard, Common; Buzzard, Jackal; Cameroptera, Green-backed; Canary, Cape; Canary, Yellow-fronted; Chat, Ant-eating; Chat, Buff-streaked; Chat, Familiar; Cisticola, Levaillant’s ; Coot, Red-knobbed; Cormorant, Reed; Crane, Blue; Crane, Grey-crowned; Crow, Cape; Cuckoo, Black; Cuckoo, Emerald; Cuckoo, Red-chested; Darter, African; Drongo, Fork-tailed; Duck, Yellow-billed; Eagle, African Fish; Eagle, Crowned; Eagle, Long-crested; Egret, Great; Egret, Little; Fiscal, Common; Flycatcher, Dusky; Flycatcher, Paradise; Flycatcher, Southern Black; Goose, Egyptian; Grebe, Little; Greenbul, Sombre; Guineafowl, Helmeted; Hamerkop; Hawk, African Harrier; Heron, Black-headed; Ibis, Sacred (Polela River); Kingfisher, Brown-hooded; Kingfisher, Giant; Kite, Yellow-billed; Lapwing, Blacksmith; Lapwing, Wattled; Lark, Rufous-naped; Martin, Banded; Martin, Brown-throated; Moorhen, Common; Oriole, Black-headed; Pigeon, African Olive; Pipit, African; Prinia, Drakensburg; Prinia, Tawny-flanked; Puffback, Black-backed; Quelea, Red-billed; Raven, White-necked; Robin-Chat, Cape; Ruff; Seedeater, Streaky-headed; Shelduck; Shoveller, Cape; Sparrow, House; Spoonbill, African; Spurfowl, Red-necked; Starling, European; Stilt, Black-winged; Stonechat, African; Stork, White; Sugarbird, Gurney’s; Sunbird, Collared; Sunbird, Greater Double-collared; Sunbird, Olive; Sunbird, Southern Double-collared; Swallow, Greater-striped; Swallow, White-throated; Swift, African Black; Teal, Red-billed; Tern, Whiskered; Thrush, Olive; Thrush, Orange Ground; Turaco, Knysna; Vulture, Cape; Wagtail, Cape; Warbler, Yellow-throated Woodland; Waxbill, Common; Weaver, Cape; White-eye, Cape; Whydah, Pin-tailed; Widowbird, Fan-tailed; Widowbird, Long-tailed; Widowbird, Red-collared; Wood-hoopoe, Green; Woodpecker, Ground; Woodpecker, Olive.